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5 nurse traits that can help you lose weight

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Most of the nurses I have had the pleasure of working with share a common theme in regards to weight loss. They all are very aware of their health risks, and wish they could do something about it, but they simply don’t have the time.

It’s usually the full-time job of additional (and usually needed) over-time, or the full-time job that is your family, or the full-time job of being a student. One thing is for sure, being a nurse is not the reason why nurses don’t maintain a healthier lifestyle. I for one believe in quite the contrary. I think nurses (of all people) already posses the qualities needed to improve their health and wellness.

Why?

Just by being a nurse, you already hold the key to weight loss success! Let’s review:

  • Utilization of resources

We do this better than anyone. We are the ‘wrangler’ when it comes to all the different services needed to care for our patients in the most effective manner. We are the ‘bridge’ that gets everyone traveling across those muddied waters safely.

This is also the key to losing weight and improving your wellness. Using the internet, your local gym, a friend or colleague that has experienced the success you seek. You will be amazed at what is out there for the taking. A little bit of effort and researching will go a long way!

  • Great time management skills

We all know what is needed to get the job done, even if the job can’t be done in your allotted time – we still get it done. Some how we juggle the ADL’s, med passes, emergencies, test, procedures, physician needs, family needs, ancillary task, transfers, discharges, admissions and short staffing to safely advocate and care for our patients in the most efficient, effective and compassionate way possible.

While ‘time’ is not something you have a lot of, you can utilize your time wisely to increase your activity, prepare your meals, walk instead of taking the elevator, etc. This list is endless. Who better than to create a workable plan?

  • Know the value of good foot wear

We are on our feet more than we’d like to admit. Walking, running, and standing are usually the only three positions we know during our shifts. Sitting down is a distant dream for most shifts. Our feet only survive the day because we know what NOT to put on our feet.

The number one pain and deterrent of exercise these days is foot, ankle, knee, hip and back pain shortly after beginning a new routine. Most of these aches and pains are due to improperly fitted or simply poorly chosen footwear. You’re an expert and you didn’t even know it.

  • Type A personality

Attention to detail – need I say more? Paying attention to the smallest of things during our day make the biggest impact most of the time.

The same goes for your health and wellness. Success is in the small details and the fine-tuned adjustments you make custom tailored to your body, your needs, your wants, and your lifestyle (this ties into the resources and time management skillset as well)

  • Natural problem solver

We HATE when we can’t figure out the ‘why’ with our patients. I have personally exhausted myself on many occasions because something just didn’t ‘fit’ with a patients presentation or progression. We will go to great lengths utilizing our resources to solve the mystery – all for the sake of our patients.

Guess what? Apply this very same attitude to your own health and you will be amazed at the results!

Any questions?

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Sean Dent

Sean Dent is a second-degree nurse who has worked in telemetry, orthopedics, surgical services, oncology and at times as a travel nurse. He is a CCRN certified critical care nurse where he's worked in cardiac, surgical as well as trauma intensive care nursing. After five years practicing as an RN, Sean pursued and attained his Masters of Science in Nursing. Sean currently practices as a Board Certified Acute Care Nurse Practitioner (ACNP-BC) in a Shock Trauma urban teaching hospital. He has been in healthcare for almost 20 years. He originally received a bachelor's degree in Exercise and Sport Science where he worked as a Certified Athletic Trainer (ATC).
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