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Author Archives: This I Believe

This I Believe

About This I Believe

Based on a 1950s radio program of the same name, This I Believe® is an exciting national project that invites you to write about the core beliefs that guide your daily life. The series has enjoyed a four year run on NPR's Morning Edition and All Things Considered. Visit the special "Scrubs Magazine Reader Submission Form" on the This I Believe website to contribute your own essay. Essays by Scrubs Magazine readers could be featured on both This I Believe and on Scrubs Magazine!

The obnoxious nurse who inspired me

The obnoxious nurse who inspired me

An “unprofessional, disrespectful, rude, obnoxious, uncaring, and heartless” nurse inspired this woman to become a nurse herself…so she could treat her patients the way they would want to be treated.

This I believe: Stepping out of fear

This I believe: Stepping out of fear

Today this nurse is a successful entrepreneur. But yesterday, she lived in fear. Now she’s just proud to have ventured out into the unknown, win or lose.

I believe in grandparents

I believe in grandparents

“Grandpa and Grandma took care of their own parents over the years. At first it was the small things…but as my great-grandparents health deteriorated…it became so much more.”

Did you choose nursing to become a hero?

Did you choose nursing to become a hero?

Don’t assume “heroes” are just comic book characters. The world is full of heroes…and we need them all.

A universe of hope

A universe of hope

This nurse midwife believes that it only takes a moment to open a universe of hope. The tools are simple: Graciousness, humility, and love.

Image: © iStockphoto.com

The inviolability of human life

As a nurse caring for both children and the elderly, she has had the profound honor of caring for people during some of their most challenging and life-altering experiences.

How do you measure success?

How do you measure success?

One nurse’s powerful essay about success and how it is measured not in material things but in character. Although she shared her beliefs in 1954, her words resonate as powerfully today as ever.

I can make things better

I can make things better

My first time doing CPR on a real person was the night I learned how to be a nurse. In that long first year of nursing, I had learned the science and the mechanics, but that shift taught me so much more.

I believe in: Humility in our daily lives

I believe in: Humility in our daily lives

This nurse practitioner learned this from her father: Humility is realizing that the world keeps turning without you.

This I believe: we will commune with endurance

This I believe: we will commune with endurance

I am a nurse. I am not a doctor. I don’t try and cheat death. I offer comfort, a smile, a skilled hand. For many days I will open my eyes in the morning and I will have a choice. To find joy or not. To help or not. To continue or not.

The RN across the street

The RN across the street

Claudia had been our neighbor for about 8 years. She was our nurse on call. Any time my dying father needed pain relief, she would simply walk over and administer his medication. Even in the middle of the night.

It’s great to be a mammal

It’s great to be a mammal

I look back on thousands of hours spent sitting beside nursing mothers and babies in my career as a hospital nurse and board certified lactation consultant. The process of nurturing young mammals still enthralls me.

The addicted nurse

The addicted nurse

Catherine and I were nurses together in the intensive care unit. During our long, 12-hour night shifts, we often worked side by side. I liked Catherine, and we’d talk all night. What I didn’t know was that she was stealing and injecting powerful narcotics.

My duty to provide care

My duty to provide care

This nursing student wonders, “If each of us has the right to decide whether or not to provide care, what would happen if we all denied it?”

Image: Jon Feingersh | Blend Images | Getty Images

The Power of Hope

In my early twenties, as a pediatric nurse, dealing with too many children diagnosed with cancer and other dreadful afflictions, I was surrounded by hope. I see it now.