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Support for nurses means more than their hose

Being in nursing takes a special person; being the spouse or partner of a nurse takes an even more special person. I think it is helpful to be with someone who is in a profession related to the field but not necessarily the same job. Although, of course, there are always exceptions to this rule; one of my favorite couples is an RN-RN combo and they get along splendidly.

But a related field (firefighter, police officer, etc.) is nice as well because they know just enough to sympathize with your day but not too much that they cease to be amazed with your vast scientific nursing knowledge.  Sometimes it can be hard to not take out your frustrations on your spouse or family or significant other. We tend to be the harshest with those who are closest to us. We can’t take it out on our patients and we shouldn’t take it out on our family and friends, but sometimes the emotional dumpster is full and we need to release the trash!

This is where finding a therapeutic outlet like exercise or meditation or whatever is a fine idea to protect those around us who love us. When someone really understands or can truly empathize with what a “bad” day means for us at work, it is truly a gift. A bad day for us can be witnessing the deaths of multiple people, children, tragedies, assault, weary bones, yelling nurse managers, and well—I’m sure you can think of a million more examples.

Look around at the people you love and who love you and give them an extra hug today. Behind every great nurse is a great support system!

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Rebekah Child

Rebekah Child attended the University of Southern California for her bachelor's in nursing and decided to brave the academic waters and return for her master's in nursing education, graduating in 2003 from Mount St. Mary's. Rebekah has also taught nursing clinical and theory at numerous Southern California nursing schools and has been an emergency nurse since 2002. She is currently one of the clinical educators for an emergency department in Southern California and a student (again!) in the doctoral program at the University of California, Los Angeles.
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