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You know you’re a CNA when…

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How do you know you’re a CNA?

See if you recognize yourself in the following tongue-in-cheek list, compiled by a former CNA who’s been there, done that.


1. You never leave home without your back brace and gait belt.
2. You change more linens than a hotel maid.
3. You have at least 20 sets of adoptive grandparents.
4. You keep up with the number of BMs your family has.
5. The beds in your home are made with “hospital corners.”
6. You can easily feed three or more people at one time.
7. You don’t get grossed out by what you find in adult briefs.
8. You can find 101+ uses for towels, sheets and pillowcases.
9. When your spouse holds your hand, you catch yourself doing range-of-motion exercises.
10. You tell your spouse that he/she is facing the wrong way at the wrong time in bed.

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Rachael Rainer

Rachael Rainer is a thirty-something LPN in Mississippi working the night shift. You can find more of her writing on her blog: rebelgirllpn.blogspot.com/ and get her Twitter feed at twitter.com/Rebelgirl1978.
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12 Responses to You know you’re a CNA when…

  1. Vadim Firsov

    Hi! I am Russian- American,and I am licensed. CNA. Me going to college and I want to be a nurse practitioner, because I am spoil and no wont to work on minimum wages, but I may to work part time, and may be I will.

  2. Nancy Geddings, RN

    Every new nurse should have to “work” in a CNA’s shoes for at least 2 weeks! Day shift! Appreciate those I work with!

    • shannajones

      I agree!!!! I have been a CNA for several years and let me tell you we are not paid what were worth, We do all the lifting the retraining of toilet use, feeding and so much more, the nurses do not even know much about the residents they always have to come to us and ask, so yes they need t walk in our shoes, reverse the tables if only for a day.

  3. NLongmire

    LOL amen Nancy G!! Maybe that would stop some of that crazy hateful behavior! Love these posts! Too cute!
    Rachael you rock!

    Ok here’s mine
    When you accidently walk in on your hubby urinating and declare he should have more fluids.

  4. kim bennett, cna

    do you ever find yourself knocking on closed doors at your own house or answering the phone with your name and the floor you are working on?

    • p1nkp4nth3r

      Yup…especially the bthrm door. Lol. My kids will catch me doing that. Lol

  5. Peach

    Only two weeks? I think every person that wants to be a nurse should spend one year as a CNA in long term care…one year in acute care setting… one year as a LPN in long term care… one year in acute care setting. The majority of RN’s today are lazy and have NO clue what it’s like to work in each of these levels. The best RN’s are those that have worked their way up thru the ranks. I’d rather have an excellent CNA care for me than a RN… any day!

  6. jennifer

    What about CMA’s? They are just as important. Nobody ever recognizes them for anything. They are the nurses right hand and eyes and ears on the floor ;)

  7. Pam Vanzant

    I came up through the ranks. First, as N.A. in long-term care for about 2 yrs, then in a hospital on the tele unit for about 1-2 yrs, then I got educated more, I became an L.P.N. and worked in the same hospital for about a yr, then went back to long-term care for about 3 yrs, then moved and worked in a hospital again for 11 yrs, and went back to college and got my R.N. degree. I developed Crohn’s Disease while I was working and attending college. I finally had to stop working and am now on disability. I cared for my husband until he passed away last yr. and am now caring for my mom with help. I still miss working.with patients, nurses, doctors and families.

  8. AprilM87

    Nancy Geddings, RN. I agree every nurse should have to work as a CNA, but not dayshift…. evening shift. Every place I have ever worked, daylight has a few gotten up by midnight shift. We put everyone to bed, and still get told we take too much time. Or about how we were told 15/16 patients a piece if an RN would leave early we could have a 3rd person.

  9. Pingback: You know you’re a CNA when… « CNA Talk

  10. thom0

    My patient needs a bandage.

    No, not like that.

    Just get out of my way.

    Never send a nurse to do a CNA’ s job.